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Marriage (Wales) Act 2010

Type of Bill:
Private Members' Bill (Starting in the House of Lords)
Sponsors:
Lord Rowe-Beddoe
Alun Michael

Progress of the Bill

Bill started in the House of Lords

  1. House of Lords
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. Report stage
    5. 3rd reading
  2. House of Commons
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. Report stage
    5. 3rd reading
  3. Consideration of Amendments
  4. Royal Assent

Last event

Act of Parliament

House Act Date
Commons Marriage (Wales) Act 2010 c.6 | PDF version, 65KB 18.03.2010

Latest news on the Marriage (Wales) Act 2010

Following agreement by both Houses on the text of the Bill it received Royal Assent on 18 March. The Bill is now an Act of Parliament (law).

Summary of the Marriage (Wales) Act 2010

The purpose of the Marriage (Wales) Bill is to change the legal requirements for getting married in the Church of Wales. 

At the moment, it is normally required that at least one of those getting married should reside in the parish where the wedding is to take place. This Bill would allow people with a qualifying connection to a parish to hold their wedding there, even if they do not live within the parish. 

The Church of England Marriage Measure 2008 made similar changes to the requirements for getting married in the Church of England.

Key areas

  • The Bill would allow people to marry in the Church of Wales parish where they live, where they usually worship or to which they have a qualifying connection.
  • A person would have a qualifying connection to a parish if he or she:
    ­  - was baptised in that parish (unless the baptism took place in a combined rite which included baptism and confirmation)
    ­  - had his or her confirmation entered in the register book of confirmation for any church or chapel in that parish
    ­  - has ever had his or her usual place of residence in that parish for a period of at least six months
    ­  - has ever habitually attended public worship in that parish for a period of at least six months
      -­ has a parent who has, during the person’s lifetime, had their usual place of residence in that parish for a period of at least six months, or habitually attended public worship in that parish for a period of at least six months
    ­  - has a parent or grandparent who got married in that parish.
  • People wishing to get married would have to provide information to the minister of the parish to prove their qualifying connection.

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Related information

Guide to the passage of a Bill

Find out what happens at each stage of a Public Bill’s journey through Parliament with the Passage of a Bill guide.

When does a Bill become law?

Explanation of what happens after Bills have been passed, and when laws may change.