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Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill [HL] 2017-19

Type of Bill:
Government Bill
Sponsors:
Lord O'Shaughnessy
Health and Social Care
Matt Hancock
Health and Social Care

Progress of the Bill

Bill started in the House of Lords

  1. House of Lords
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. Report stage
    5. 3rd reading
  2. House of Commons
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. Report stage
    5. 3rd reading
  3. Consideration of Amendments
  4. Royal Assent

Last event

  • Committee stage: House of Commons Committee stage: House of Commons | 15.01.2019

Next event

  • Committee stage: House of Commons Committee stage: House of Commons | 17.01.2019

Latest Bill

House Bill Date
Commons Bill 303 2017-19 (as brought from the Lords) | PDF version 12.12.2018

Latest news on the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill [HL] 2017-19

This Bill is now being considered by a Public Bill Committee which will scrutinise the Bill line by line and is expected to report to the House by Thursday 24 January 2019. 

The membership of the Public Bill Committee has been announced by the Committee of Selection:

Additional Information

 

Additional information 

  • About Parliament: Passage of a Bill
  • Briefing Paper: Commons Library briefing paper on the Bill
  • Bill Documents: Including text of the Bill, explanatory notes, amendment papers and briefing papers

Summary of the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill [HL] 2017-19

A Bill to amend the Mental Capacity Act 2005 in relation to procedures in accordance with which a person may be deprived of liberty where the person lacks capacity to consent, and for connected purposes

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