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Allhallows Staining Church Act 2010

Type of Bill:
Private Bill
Parliamentary agents:
Bircham Dyson Bell LLP
Promoted by:
The Clothworkers' Company
Petitioning period:
Lords: 26.1.2010 to 8.2.2010 Commons: 19.3.2010 to 29.3.2010

Progress of the Bill

Bill started in the House of Lords

  1. House of Lords
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. 3rd reading
  2. House of Commons
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. Report stage
    5. 3rd reading
  3. Consideration of Amendments
  4. Royal Assent

Last event

Act of Parliament

House Act Date
Allhallows Staining Church Act 2010 28.07.2010

Latest news on the Allhallows Staining Church Act 2010

The Bill received Royal Assent on 27 July 2010. It is now an Act of Parliament (i.e. it has become law): Allhallows Staining Church Act 2010 (Chapter v). 

Petition information

The Bill received Royal Assent on 27 July 2010. It is now an Act of Parliament (i.e. it has become law): Allhallows Staining Church Act 2010 (Chapter v). There will be no further opportunities to present petitions against this Bill.

Summary of the Allhallows Staining Church Act 2010

The Bill (as originally introduced) removes certain statutory restrictions applying to land which makes up the site of the former church of Allhallows Staining, its churchyard, and other adjoining land in the City of London. It would:

  • repeal sections 4(2)(b) to (e) of the Allhallows Staining Churchyard Act 1961 to remove certain restrictions placed by the 1961 Act on the churchyard relating to the licensing process when seeking to disturb a grave; accessing a grave in the churchyard; access rights of the incumbent of the united benefices of St Olave Hart Street, Allhallows Staining and St Katherine Coleman; and the erection of buildings on the churchyard
  • make provision for the legal use, development or disposal of the land stipulated in the Bill. It would, however, be necessary to obtain permissions from any individuals affected along with the normal planning and listed building consents
  • impose detailed procedures to be followed by the company (the Livery Company known as the Clothworkers’ Company - the sponsor of the Bill) when seeking to remove human remains
  • make provision for the removal and re-erection of tombstones and memorials. The selection of the new location would be agreed by the relative of the deceased person or their representative

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