Secondary navigation

Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010

Type of Bill:
Government Bill
Sponsors:
Jack Straw
Ministry of Justice
Lord Bach
Ministry of Justice

Progress of the Bill

Bill started in the House of Commons

  1. House of Commons
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. Report stage
    5. 3rd reading
  2. House of Lords
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. Report stage
    5. 3rd reading
  3. Consideration of Amendments
  4. Royal Assent

Act of Parliament

House Act Date
Commons Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010 c.25 | PDF version, 289KB 12.04.2010

Latest news on the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010

This Bill was originally laid before Parliament in the 2008-09 Session.

Following agreement by both Houses on the text of the Bill it received Royal Assent on 8 April. The Bill is now an Act of Parliament (law).

Summary of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010

As introduced, this was a wide-ranging Bill covering a number of different policy areas. Many of the proposals had their origins in the 'Governance of Britain' Green Paper published in July 2007. The content of the Bill as introduced varied in some significant ways from its draft version. New chapters were added to the Bill and the clauses on the Attorney General which were in the draft Bill are not included. The Bill was greatly amended during its passage through Parliament, but many provisions were then removed during ‘wash-up’.

Key areas in the Bill as introduced

  • establishes a statutory basis for management of the civil service
  • introduces a new parliamentary process for the ratification of treaties
  • provides for the end of by-elections for hereditary peers
  • makes provisions to allow for the suspension, resignation and expulsion of Members of the Lords
  • introduces new rules on protests around Parliament
  • introduces new rules on time limits for human rights actions against devolved administrations
  • makes various provisions relating to judicial office holders, including the removal of the Prime Minister’s role in the process of appointing Supreme Court judges
  • establishes a new corporate structure for the National Audit Office and a limit to the term of appointment to the office of Comptroller and Auditor General
  • introduces measures designed to increase the transparency of financial reporting to Parliament.

During the passage of the Bill a number of clauses were added to the Bill including:

  • provisions on the nationality requirements for civil servants
  • provision for a referendum on the voting system
  • amendments to the Parliamentary Standards Act 2009
  • provisions on the tax status of MPs and Members of the House of Lords
  • a repeal of part of the Act of Settlement to allow non-British National peers to take their seats in the House of Lords
  • a requirement for returning officers to take reasonable steps to begin counting votes given on ballot papers within four hours of the close of a poll

However, during wash-up, the following were removed from the Bill:

  • provisions on the nationality requirements of civil servants
  • the provision for a referendum on the voting system
  • provisions for the end of the by-elections for hereditary peers
  • the provisions allowing for suspension, resignation and expulsion of Members of the Lords
  • the provisions on demonstrations in the vicinity of Parliament
  • the provisions on human rights claims against devolved administrations
  • provisions about courts and tribunals
  • provisions on National Audit

Stay up to date

Keep up to date with the progress of Bills going through Parliament. Sign up for email alerts or use our RSS feeds.

Related information

Guide to the passage of a Bill

Find out what happens at each stage of a Public Bill’s journey through Parliament with the Passage of a Bill guide.

When does a Bill become law?

Explanation of what happens after Bills have been passed, and when laws may change.

Human rights

Do you have expertise or a special interest in human rights? The Joint Committee on Human Rights scrutinises the human rights implications of Government Bills.